Skip Nav

AP Lit Terms Quiz

GENERAL CONCEPTS

❶A particular form of a language that is peculiar to a specific region or social group. A type of language that consists of words and phrases that are regarded as very informal, are more common in speech than writing.

Report this User

Can you pick the English 12 - Literary Terms and Devices?


A character who grows and changes as a result of the plot. The representation of something as less than it really is, for ironic effect. A word or phrase that is not formal or literary, typically one used in ordinary or familiar conversation. Some sort of incongruity discrepancy between appearance and reality. Two objects or ideas are put in opposition to one another to show or emphasize the differences between them.

The comparison of one thing to another without the use of like or as. The distinct personality, style, or point of view of a piece of writing or any other creative work. Commonly used in an earlier time but rare in present-day usage. A metaphor introduced and then further developed throughout all or part of a literary work, especially a poem. A character who contrasts with another character usually the protagonist in order to highlight particular qualities of the other character.

A fourteen line poem, usually written in iambic pentameter. The turning point of a narrative work is its point of highest tension or drama or when the action starts in which the solution is given. A series of related incidents builds toward the point of greatest interest. An examination designed to expose similarities between two objects or ideas.

The recurrence of similar sounds, especially consonants, in close proximity. Based on or influenced by personal feelings, tastes, or opinions. The way in which something is written, as opposed to the meaning of what is written. Easy to identify because the character or narrator speaks to readers in his or her own voice, frequently using the pronoun 'I'.

A person whom audiences readily recognize from frequent recurrences in a particular literary tradition. Archetypal characters distinguished by their flatness. The final part of a play, movie, or narrative in which the strands of the plot are drawn together and matters are explained or resolved. A character who remains constant in his or her beliefs, attitudes, behaviors, personality. A third person narrator whose knowledge is limited to one character, either major or minor.

Uses words directly according to their proper meanings signified. Figurative or non-literal language uses words in figures of speech. Two lines of verse, usually in the same meter and joined by rhyme, that form a unit. The writer tells what happens without stating more than can be inferred from the story's action and dialogue.

The narrator never discloses anything about what the characters think. A particular form of a language that is peculiar to a specific region or social group.

A group of lines forming the basic recurring metrical unit in a poem; a verse. Also known as a poetry paragraph. A type of language that consists of words and phrases that are regarded as very informal, are more common in speech than writing. A nonliteral comparison between two unlike things, usually connected by the words 'like,' 'as,' or 'seems. That method of characterization in which the author, by exposition or analysis, tells us directly what a character is like, or has someone else in the story do so.

The part of a literary plot that occurs after the climax has been reached and the conflict has been resolved. A phrase, line, or group of lines repeated at intervals throughout a poem. An ending from a piece of writing that is open to interpretation to the reader. Any expressive use of language, as a metaphor, simile, personification, or antithesis, in which words are used in other than their literal sense. The reader learns about the character's personality through his thoughts, words and actions, and through the way other characters react to him.

Correspondence of sound between words or the endings of words, especially when these are used at the ends of lines of poetry.

A poet's deliberate pattern of lines that rhyme with other lines in a poem or a stanza. A line of verse with five metrical feet, each consisting of one short or unstressed syllable followed by one long or stressed syllable, for example Two households, both alike i.

A language designed for use in situations in which natural language is unsuitable. A transition in a story to an earlier time, that interrupts the normal chronological order of events. Comparing one thing with another from a different category: A remark or passage by a character in a play that is intended to be heard by the audience but unheard by the other characters in the play.

A long speech by one actor in a play or movie, or as part of a theatrical or broadcast program. This narrator, instead of focusing on one character only, often tells us everything about many characters. Romantic style literature relied more heavily on this form. Deliberately suggesting two or more different, and sometimes conflicting, meanings in a work.

An event or situation that may be interpreted in more than one way- this is done on purpose by the author, when it is not done on purpose, it is vagueness, and detracts from the work.

A character in the play or story thinks one thing is true, but the audience or reader knows better. During the second war with Iraq, American troops complained of a fierce sand storm that made even the night-vision equipment useless.

A British commando commented about the storm: An indirect reference to something usually from literature, etc. If the character is asking a god or goddess for inspiration it is called an invocation. Brief story, told to illustrate a point or serve as an example of something,often shows character of an individual. Words which are inaccurate if interpreted literally, but are used to describe.

Similes and metaphors are common forms. Removing ad is a premium feature.


Main Topics

Privacy Policy

A quiz of 40 useful literary terms for literature students. LIterary Terms Quiz. A quiz of 40 useful literary terms for literature students.

Privacy FAQs

The literary term, Poetry, is covered in this multiple choice quiz. Please review the definition and examples before you complete the Poetry quiz. Literary Terms.

About Our Ads

Quizzes › Education › Literacy › Do You Know These Literacy Terms? Do You Know These Literacy Terms? 16 Questions | By assonance, onomatopoeia, metaphor, and simile by playing this quiz. Reveal Answers: During the Quiz (Practice Mode) End of Quiz (Exam Mode) Number of questions American Literary Time Periods ; Urmmm Random. Evaluate your knowledge of common literary terms for poetry with an interactive quiz and printable worksheet. Use the practice questions to see.

Cookie Info

Start studying Poetry: Literary Terms Quiz 2. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. Start studying English- Literary Terms Quiz- Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools.